Home » News » Staying ahead of viruses

Staying ahead of viruses

Early detection can save lives. Wageningen virologists are collaborating with veterinarians to detect potential pathogens in wildlife and livestock as early as possible.

Diseases that can be passed from animals to humans are able to spread more rapidly due to globalisation and urbanisation. Therefore, early detection can save lives. Wageningen virologists are collaborating with veterinarians to detect potential pathogens in wildlife and livestock as early as possible. Researchers unravel the genetic makeup of viruses to assess risks and develop vaccines. They share their expertise with peers around the globe in an effort to stay ahead of threats.

Read more in the weblog of Wageningen University & Research.

(Inter)national Network

There is a global link between the health of humans, animals and their surroundings. We use the term ‘Global One Health’. This includes diseases that are transferable from animals to humans such as malaria and avian influenza and resistance to antibiotics in bacteria.’ Professor Wim van der Poel of WUR points out. There is a broad collaboration on the issue of “One Health”. At a national level, scientists join forces in the Netherlands Center for One Health (NCOH). There is also a European research network, the European Joint Program for One Health (OHEJP).