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Latest News

Interview: ‘I found my sweet spot’

Initially looking at a career in drug development, Remy Muts’ interest in fundamental research finally brought him to where he is now: researching the complement system to find a possible therapeutic application.

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NCOH webinar 7 October 2021 ‘No Rabies in 2030’

Rabies kills one person every 9 minutes, with over half of them children. It is a zoonotic and viral disease which occurs in more than 150 countries. In this webinar we hear from the experts about rabies and how to fight this virus.

WHO report: Europe urgently needs integral reform of healthcare, surveillance and governance

Prof. dr. ir. Louise O. Fresco, president of Wageningen University & Research (WUR), was part of the Pan-European commission on Health and Sustainable Development in this latest WHO report.

NCOH Student Travel Grant

The NCOH awards a number of travel grants to PhD students of NCOH Partners selected to present their abstract at an international One Health-related academic conference.

Successful webinar on Emerging Zoonosis

On 2 September the NCOH webinar on Emerging Zoonosis & how the contagious jump between animals & humans took us to Africa and back. The experts talked about finding new viruses, and also the importance of looking at human health and disease.

Interview: ‘The amount of data transferred by viruses could be the biggest collection of data in the world’

Combining her knowledge of viruses and data, Ling-Yi Wu is developing computational pipelines that biologists can use to study viruses and microbes.

Interview: ‘I value that my research has social relevance’

Jesse Kerkvliet, a bio-computer scientist, likes working with interesting model systems, but also thinks it’s important his research aims at solving real world problems.

Interview: ‘The experiments surprise me almost every time’

Using large, cooled magnets, Maik Derks is studying how antibiotics bind to molecules in bacteria.