Home » Featured Articles » Interview: Microbiome and its relation with disease is the perfect topic for me

Interview: Microbiome and its relation with disease is the perfect topic for me

This is the second interview with the PhD students of the Metagenomics projects in a series of 8 background articles. Keep following this website for the next interview in this series.


Interview with Quinten Ducarmon, PhD student of the project ‘Mechanisms of microbiota-mediated defence against various infectious diseases’.

‘I have been curious about the human body since a young age. And especially in why some people fall ill, while others do not. During my education I learned a lot about human health and disease, but something was still missing. After my master MSc internship at the department of Microbiology & Systems Biology at TNO, I knew that I wanted to continue in the field of microbiome research. Its intriguing relationship with many different diseases and even with effectiveness in response to therapy is what makes this topic perfect for me.’

‘Microbiome research is booming, but this has not yet led to a lot of implementations for improved clinical outcome. With my research I hope to identify microbes that can subsequently be used for further in vitro and in vivo studies, with the ultimate aim of using these for improved clinical outcome of disease treatment, or even prevention of disease altogether.’

‘I very much enjoy the working environment at the LUMC Center for Microbiome Analyses and Therapeutics (CMAT), with equally enthusiastic people as myself. The fact that we have projects with many different departments, ranging from cancer to infectious diseases to psychiatric disease, perfectly fits my broad interest in human health. My PhD project started in January 2018 and we already have several promising results. First, several microbes have been identified which may be associated with C. difficile colonization and/or infection. In line with this, I am writing a review on how the gut microbiota can mediate colonization resistance against enteric pathogens. Lastly, for now, is that we are optimizing the microbiome workflow, from sampling to the choice of a bioinformatics pipeline.’

PhD project: Mechanisms of microbiota-mediated defence against various infectious diseases.

More News

Save the date: next NCOH Science Café on 29 October

It’s time for an update! You and all NCOH scientists are invited to join the NCOH Science Café on 29 October 2019 to get up to speed with the latest developments, meet fellow NCOH colleagues, and establish new collaborations. Feel free to inform your fellow researchers and PhD students about the Science Café, they will... More

People themselves are main source of ESBL antibiotic resistance

Researchers from the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Utrecht University, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Animal Health Service and Wageningen Bioveterinary Research, all members of the ESBLAT consortium, have previously shown that ESBL antimicrobial resistance is common in humans, livestock and companion animals, food of animal origin and the environment. However, ESBL... More

One Health applications for prophylactic vaccines and preventive strategies – A joint call by Netherlands Centre for One Health and Top Sector Life Sciences & Health

The Netherlands Centre for One Health (NCOH) was allocated a budget of two million euro Public-Private Partnership (PPP) Allowance to organise and realise their first PPP call. This call involves strategic partnerships under the Knowledge and Innovation Agenda of Top Sector Life Sciences & Health (LSH): One Health call.

More

Antimicrobial resistance remains fairly stable in the Netherlands

The number of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics is increasing globally. In the Netherlands this number remains fairly stable and is lower than in many other countries. Nevertheless, there is still cause for concern and caution. This is evident from the annual report NethMap/MARAN 2019 in which various organisations jointly present data on antibiotic... More